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FULL South Pole Ski Expedition

Are you a serious adventurer looking for the challenge of a lifetime? Join us for the 2018-2019 South Pole season by embarking on this very demanding & deeply rewarding expedition. The Full South Pole Expedition challenges even the most experienced adventurers. Expect persistent winds, heavy sleds, eight to ten hours of skiing each day and temperatures plunging well below zero. Expect also pristine wilderness, surreal beauty and an opportunity to get to know Antarctica's many moods. Polar exploration at its finest!

Like early polar explorers you will embark for the South Pole from the edge of Antarctica, climbing from sea level and scaling the Polar Plateau. Prior experience is required for this extreme expedition. Contact PolarExplorers for more information here.

 

  • Itinerary
  • Equipment List
  • Qualifications
  • Dates & Rates
  • Trip Insurance
  • Testimonials
  • Blogs

South Pole Full Daily Itinerary

Pre-expedition: Meet in Punta Arenas, Chile for individual gear checks, review of expedition procedures & a variety of logistical preparations. 

Day 1 (November 18, 2018)
Depart for Antarctica. The 4.5 hour flight will take us across the Drake Passage, past the coast of Antarctica and to the Union Glacier basecamp.
Day 2-3
We'll spend two days (+/-) at or near the Union Glacier basecamp base camp practicing our routine and ensuring that "all systems are go" before we depart for our starting point. This will likely include an overnight shakedown with our loaded sleds as well as time to acclimatize to the spectacular environment.
Day 5-47
A short flight by ski-equipped Twin Otter takes us to Hercules Inlet or the Messner Start, our two different starting points for this expedition. Depending on the route the first few days may see us climbing from approximately sea level to 800 meters. From Hercules Inlet, the Geographic South Pole lies over a thousand kilometers away (730 miles). From the Messner Start it lies 930 kilometers away (580 miles). The terrain will vary from wind blasted snow, to blue ice (very slick), to softer snow. We will also encounter sastrugi (wind patterns in the snow) which can range in size from a few centimeters to over a meter. As we make our way south, we'll pass beautiful nunataks (tips of mountains poking up through the snow) and see mountains both near and far. The temperatures may range significantly, but we can expect anything from -15c to -40 c. The wind will often be in our face as it pours off the Antarctic plateau towards the ocean. It will be one of the many challenges that we face on a daily basis. Additionally, we'll continue a gradual ascent from 800 meters to approximately 3,330 meters near the South Pole.
Day 48+
Extra time built into the itinerary for weather delays, rest days, etc.

South Pole FULL Expedition: Equipment List

Upon registration, you will receive a comprehensive PolarExplorers gear guide that explains the importance of each item as well as gear recommendations from our past participants.

  • 1 pair skis and ski poles
  • 1 pair skins covering the full length of your skis
  • 1 pair snow pack ski boots
  • Sleeping bag rated to at least -35° Celsius
  • Bivy sack
  • 2 sleeping pads
  • 1 wind anorak with hood
  • 1 wind pants
  • 1 insulated parka with hood
  • 1 warm fleece jacket and pants
  • 2 sets synthetic underwear, medium weight top and bottom- 2nd set optional
  • 3 sets mitts: 1 regular, 1 overmitts, 1 spare regular mitts or gloves
  • 2 pair liner or "working" gloves
  • 2 hats: 1 lightweight balaclava, 1 ski type
  • 2 neck gaiters
  • 3 pair socks and sock liners
  • 1 face mask
  • Sun glasses and/ or mountain ski glasses
  • 2 pr. anti-fog goggles
  • 1 sturdy small backpack with waist belt and sternum strap
  • 2 Thermos bottles or insulated water bottles
  • 1 set eating utensils with bowl
  • Pocket knife / multi-tool
  • Personal toiletries
  • 1 pee bottle (small plastic bottle)
  • Face cream, lip protection
  • 4 carabiners

PolarExplorers FULL South Pole Expedition Qualifications

This is an extremely challenging expedition designed for people looking for and prepared for the ultimate adventure. A resume of your previous expedition experience and approval of the guide is required for your participation. Full medical evacuation insurance is required. Please contact us for more details.

 

South Pole Full Dates & Rates

2018-2019 Dates

November 13, 2018 - January 14, 2019 (Messner Start)

Price

Please contact us for pricing and availability.

Inclusions

Includes all accommodations and meals while in Antarctica, guide(s), permits, communication & safety gear.

Expedition Trip Insurance

Trip cancellation insurance is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED for every PolarExplorers expedition.

Medical Evacuation insurance with a minimum coverage of $300,000 USD is REQUIRED on every PolarExplorers expedition.

Ensure that your policy covers your activity, destination and any pre-existing medical conditions (to cover pre-existing medical conditions you may need to purchase your policy within 14 days or less of your initial deposit).

If you are mountaineering check that the policy covers roped technical mountain travel and the elevation limit that you will have.

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Ripcord Insurance (For non-US residents use the Offer Code "ripcordintl" which will enable you to receive quotes and/or purchase policies.) If your expedition is more than USD $30,000 you may need to send an email to: ClientServices@redpointresolutions.com or call them at +1 617-307-4636

If you live in the USA you have additional options. 

Travelex Insurance - Choose the TRAVEL SELECT policy and add the ADVENTURE PLUS PAK to receive appropriate medical evacuation coverage.

Travel Guard has comprehensive policies that include trip cancellation or you can purchase a Single Trip Medical Evacuation Important! You must include the optional Adventure Sports coverage upgrade if you are climbing any mountains or traveling in rope teams. (Pre-existing medical coverage is not available with this policy.)

South Pole FULL Expedition Testimonials

Bryony BalenMany thanks to everyone at PolarExplorers for making this expedition possible for me. I enjoyed every minute of it (even though I didn't expect to) and that was in part due to our guide's leadership.

Bryony Balen

 

Dennis WoodsIf you are seriously considering this trip you should do it. Make sure you have an iPod that has lots of fast, upbeat music. Train until it hurts for at least 6 months before departure. Take Jelly Babies and insist on lots of beer nuts from PolarExplorers.

Dennis Woods

Don't undertake this expedition lightly. Be prepared, put some weight on and get your head in the right place before you start.

Bryony Balen
  • North Pole Season Cancelled

    After many complications and delays, the entire season of North Pole expeditions has been cancelled. Early in April, flights to Barneo Ice Camp were delayed due to permitting issues with the Antonov-76. The flight providers were able to secure a Basler DC-3 to continue operations, but ultimately the Basler was unable to make flights to Barneo due to an extended period of unstable weather surrounding Longyearbyen and Barneo. In our 27 years of North Pole expeditions, we have never experienced a cancellation like this. The PolarExplorers guide team has been in Longyearbyen since the beginning of April preparing for our six North Pole expeditions, but without the ability to fly to the ice through Barneo, it is impossible to move forward. 

    We are deeply disappointed that we won't be able to share this experience with all of our amazing team members who have dedicated so much time and effort preparing for these adventures. Our team is already looking forward to returning in 2020 for another opportunity to reach the top of the world. 

    Written on Saturday, 13 April 2019 18:56 in Expedition Updates
  • North Pole Season - Two weeks and Counting!

     

    With less than two weeks until our North Pole season kicks off we are hard at work prepping and getting excited!

    The first round of our guide team has arrived in Longyearbyen and are looking forward to welcoming the first of our team members in the coming days. Our Polar Shakedown Training will kick off on April 8, followed by our expeditions on April 13.

    This is an exciting time for all involved! The world over gear is being organized, weighed and counted (then recounted!) Decisions are being made - should I take this hat? Or THIS hat?? It's all coming together for what will surely be an exciting time!

    We hope you will check back regularly to follow the progress of our teams and to listen to their daily audio dispatches.  The first blog will be posted on April 13, 2019!

    In the meantime you can meet our Last Degree Ski Teams here and our North Pole Flight team here.

    Check back again on April 13!

     

    Written on Tuesday, 02 April 2019 16:36 in Expedition Updates
  • Meet our North Pole Flight Team!

    On April 13 our North Pole Flight team will kick off their exciting top-of-the-world adventure with a pre-flight briefing and, weather permitting, a flight to the North Pole on April 14. Follow their updates on our expedition blog staring on April 13!

    Written on Monday, 01 April 2019 16:36 in Expedition Updates
  • North Pole Last Degree Teams - April 2019

     We'd like to introduce you to our 2019 North Pole Last Degree Ski Teams! These international teams will kick off their expeditions on April 13 in Longyearbyen, Norway. Make sure to bookmark our blog to read the daily updates and listen to the daily audio dispatches!

    (Each team is color-coded)

     

    Written on Monday, 01 April 2019 19:28 in Expedition Updates
  • North Pole Expeditions Coming Soon!

    The 2019 North Pole season is just around the corner! Our expedition dispatches will start on April 13.

    Make sure to bookmark this page to hear the latest from our teams!

    Written on Wednesday, 06 March 2019 20:47 in Expedition Updates
  • Heading back to Punta Arenas

    Great news! We have received word that Jim and Garrett will return to Punta Arenas tonight. The Ilyushin departed Punta Arenas mid day bound for Union Glacier. With at least an hour turn around time on the ground at UG we expect a late-night return to Punta Arenas. We are thrilled for them that the Vinson expedition was safe & successful (and pretty darn quick!)

    It's a great feeling to board the Ilyushin knowing that the return to family and friends is close at hand. The four hour flight offers an excellent opportunity to reflect upon Antarctica and experiences had on the White Continent. Upon stepping off the plane at the Punta Arenas airport it is immediately apparent that you are no longer in Antarctica and not because of the view or the temperature. Rather the scents... of Earth and floral aromas, and the humidity. It's a wonderful treat to take a few deep breaths as you walk to the terminal.

    It will be a late night, but no doubt it will feel GREAT to sleep in a proper bed and have a hot shower. Enjoy it Jim and Garrett, you deserve it!!

    This will be the last post for our Last Degree / Vinson Combo expedition. We want to congratulate Jim and Garrett on a job well done, and give Jim a virtual bear hug for his Seven Summit success. 

    Be sure to join us again in April for our North Pole season!

    Below: The Ilyushin at Union Glaicer's blue ice runway. The view from the cockpit is incredible! (previous expedition)

    Written on Monday, 21 January 2019 03:22 in Expedition Updates
  • Back at Union Glacier

    Jim and Garrett made it down safely from High Camp and all the way back to Union Glacier in one day (yesterday). No doubt the trek down was one filled with satisfaction. The anticipation and nerves that are often present on the ascent are gone allowing you to take in your surroundings with a new appreciation. And then there's the incredible flight back to Union Glacier which is stunning in every regard. 

    Union Glacier can feel like a small town after being gone for a while, and the creature comforts it provides make it a wonderful place to spend time. 

    If weather cooperates they hope to make it back to Punta Arenas today. This will be the completion of a very long journey for Jim (the Seven Summits) and one step closer to a different goal (the Grand Slam). 

    We will keep you posted. Hopefully the next blog will be posted from Punta Arenas!

    Below: Union Glacier basecamp

    Written on Sunday, 20 January 2019 18:55 in Expedition Updates
  • Vinson Summit!

    We just received word that Jim and Garrett reached the summit of Mount Vinson today at 1:35 CST. We are so happy for them and especially proud of Jim for whom this marks the completion of his Seven Summits.

    More to come later, when they are back at High Camp and have had a chance to rest. Check back again soon!

    Below: The summit of Mt. Vinson (from previous expedition)

    Written on Friday, 18 January 2019 20:14 in Expedition Updates
  • Rest Day At High Camp

    Jim and Garrett had a nice and relaxing rest day though the nylon on the tent was surely flapping. They awoke to cold temperatures of -25 F with a stiff 15-20 knot wind. There's nothing sweeter than awaking to foul weather and being able to sleep in knowing you don't have to go outside. The tent takes on an oasis feel to it and you count your blessings all the more. 

    What do you do on a rest day? Rest! Or write, play cards if you have them, chat with a friend, read if you have a book or watch a movie on a device. The main goal is to let your body recuperate and acclimatize to the higher altitude. Jim and Garrett did all those things today and they are ready for their summit attempt. The forecast is for improving conditions overnight. If they awake to good weather they will go for the summit. If the weather still has some improving to do they'll wait until the next day. We will keep you posted!

    To conserve their sat phone battery they opted not to send an audio dispatch tonight. They want to relay to everyone that they are comfortable, warm, rested and excited for the summit. 

    Check back again tomorrow!

    Below: Another view of yesterday's fixed line ascent, approaching the top (previous expedition). Thanks to PE guide Taylor Sweitzer for the pic.

    Written on Friday, 18 January 2019 03:18 in Expedition Updates
  • Ascending to High Camp

    Today Jim and Garrett ascended from Vinson's Low Camp to High Camp. This is a fairly significant climb of nearly 3,000 feet up a steep slope with fixed lines. While not a complex ascent it is certainly not easy, with burdensome packs and steep pitches. It's slow work with a lot of heavy breathing. One step, then another, then maybe a short pause before repeating, over and over again. By the time you reach the end of the fixed lines and ascend a little further into the camp it is common to be completely exhausted. Fortunately the view (when you find the energy to look around) is incredible with the vastness of Antarctica spilling from of the mountains below.

    High Camp is typically a small tent city, with multiple teams in various stages of their summit attempts. We like to climb Vinson after our Last Degree expedition for a few reasons: one of them is that by the time we get there most other Vinson teams have completed their climbs and we tend to have the mountain to ourselves (or at least almost to ourselves). It's certainly not the hustle and bustle of earlier in the season. This makes it all the more special. 

    Jim and Garrett plan to take a rest day at High Camp before attempting to reach the summit the following day. Weather is always a factor and they will keep their eye on the forecast. After today's ascent a little R & R will be good for the body (and soul!)

    Make sure to listen to Jim's audio update here & check back again tomorrow for another update from the team. 

    Audio Update continuation here.

    Below: The top of the fixed lines before heading towards High Camp. (From a previous expedition - that's Keith in the photo)

    Written on Wednesday, 16 January 2019 23:40 in Expedition Updates
  • Vinson team makes it to Low Camp

    After receiving a "no-go" on the flight to Vinson Base Camp last night (poor visibility at Vinson) they awoke at Union Glacier to good news - the weather had cleared and the flight was on. If you want a recap of what the flight is like to Vinson Base Camp read yesterday's blog. In short it is AMAZING. Absolutely stunning - and we are so glad they had perfect weather to enjoy it at its best. After arriving at Vinson Base Camp the boys (Jim and Garrett) headed up the valley to Low Camp. For Jim it was likely a refreshing change to have something to look at with every passing step. It's not that the Last Degree has no views, but it's a lot of white! White and blue...or white and grey... or just plain white. But today on Vinson it was a bluebird day. This surely made the trek to Low Camp phenomenal. Mountains flank the sides of the valley that they ascended and every time they looked up they were surely thinking to themselves "this is awesome!" Tomorrow they plan to ascend to High Camp. They will likely have a morning that's not rushed. Low Camp is in a shadow in the early morning making it a cold place. As soon as the sun appears over the peaks of the surrounding mountains everything feels easier and more welcoming - a good reason to sleep in an extra half hour or two! 

    Jim posted two wonderful audio dispatches. Make sure to have a listen!

    Jim Lumberg's Audio Dispatch (part 1)

    Jim Lumberg's Audio Dispatch (part 2)

    Below: Vinson Base Camp, which they left this morning. Thanks to SP/Vinson Alum Michael Creasy for the photo 

    Written on Tuesday, 15 January 2019 23:20 in Expedition Updates
  • En route to Punta Arenas and Vinson Basecamp!

    When we last heard from our team they were back at Union Glacier, briefly, before they continue on to their next destinations. For Jim Holliday, Steve, John and Keith the next destination is Punta Arenas. For Jim Lumberg the next destination is Mt. Vinson. 

    The team departed the South Pole for the Union Glacier basecamp around 10:30 this morning. The flight across the interior of Antarctica is amazing if you can grasp the enormity of what is passing below. Often the passing shades of white lull you into a deep state of meditation or sleep and the flight passes quickly. Other times the flight provides the perfect opportunity to reflect about life on the polar plateau - skiing in white-outs, pulling a sled, the camaraderie of tent life, and the simplicity of expedition travel. The same is true for the flight back to Punta Arenas, which is roughly four hours. It's a good time to reflect.

    When the team lands in Punta Arenas they'll transfer to their hotels where they can soak in the luxury of indoor, civilized living!

    This is not the case for Jim Lumberg who continues today to Mount Vinson, the tallest mountain in Antarctica. Jim is in the good hands of guide Garrett Madison and together they plan to depart Union Glacier today for the roughly 40 minute flight to Vinson Basecamp. This must be one of the most scenic flights in all of Antarctica. Mountains everywhere. Big glaciers. Craggy peaks. It's stunning, and a great start to this amazing climb. 

    This will be the last post for the Last Degree Ski Expedition. Great job guys! We are proud of you! And for Jim Holiday a very special congratulations on the completion of your Grand Slam. Your mom is surely smiling :)

    Check back regularly for the latest on Jim's ascent of Mt. Vison. If we receive any additional information tonight we will post it. 

    Below: The view from Union Glacier

    Written on Tuesday, 15 January 2019 01:12 in Expedition Updates
  • A day at the South Pole

    Welcome back! The team spent the day at the South Pole, taking pictures, reflecting on their experiences and relishing in their accomplishment. While they are still "rouging it" they have the luxury of heated tents that they can stand it (!!) and a basecamp chef who makes excellent meals. No doubt it feels like five star luxury to them! Everyone is doing good. They LOVE the messages that many of you are sending through to them. Soon (tomorrow if all goes as planned) four of the five team members will be returning to Punta Arenas, Chile, where hot showers, a real mattress and all the creature comforts of civilization await. Jim Lumberg will continue on to Mount Vinson where he will attempt to summit this tallest mountain in Antarctica. You can follow his progress here. We'll also post a final dispatch from Jim H, John, Steve & Keith in Punta Arenas.

    We have three audio dispatches today and they are all excellent! Have a listen to their very heartfelt messages with touching shout outs to friends and family.

    Audio dispatch #1 (Keith, Steve & John)

    Audio Dispatch #2 (Jim Holliday & Jim Lumberg)

    Audio Dispatch #3 (John)

    Below: Last night's celebration

    Below: At the Geographic South Pole

    Written on Monday, 14 January 2019 02:27 in Expedition Updates
  • The South Pole!

    We are very proud to share that our South Pole Last Degree team reached the Geographic South Pole today at 4:30 PM local time today. This is a huge moment for all of our team members and we can't be more happy for them. For Jim Holliday it marks the completion of his Explorers Grand Slam (climbing the seven summits and skiing to both poles), an endeavor he started in 2005. Congratulations to all of our team - Jim, John, Steve, Jim and Keith for this remarkable achievement. Well done!

    You might wonder what exactly is "local" time when you are standing a spot where all the time zones on the planet converge. The short answer is that it can be anytime you want! The longer answer is that people and organizations (such as the National Science Foundation or our Last Degree Ski team) choose the time zone that makes the most sense for them. The South Pole station runs on New Zealand time because all people flying to the Pole with the National Science Foundation are coming through New Zealand. Our team is on Chilean time, because they originally came from Chile. The 24 hour sun means that anytime can be morning, or night, or happy hour!

    Here's a review of our team's day. They woke up to relatively clear skies and milder temperatures (around -15F), but still had a persistent wind. This wind kicked up the ground snow into a bit of a "ground blizzard" meaning that while there was blue sky overhead the visibility of the horizon was limited. It wasn't until they were 5 nautical miles from the Pole that they got their first glimpse of the station. The the wind died a little allowing for better view during their final approach. All in they skied 11 nautical miles today - which is their longest day yet - and a full day of skiing by any standards! As if to make the last day extra special they were rewarded with a double sun dog to their left for much of the day (see below if you don't know what this is). 

    The plan is to be at the Pole for two nights before flying back to Union Glacier basecamp on the 14th, and making a quick transfer of planes to get back to Punta Arenas same day. Jim Lumberg will be staying in Antarctica to climb Mt. Vinson, Antarctica's highest mountain, and we will continue to post updates from the expedition here. In the meantime there will be more stories to share, including their time at the South Pole. 

    A couple audio dispatches came through but they we cut off. As soon as we receive another dispatch we will post it. Additional photos to follow in tomorrow's post.

    Below: A sun dog is a type of halo around the sun, caused by refraction of ice crystals. If often makes it look like there are three or four suns. This pic was taken at the South Pole, but not by our team. Hopefully they got some good shots of the double sun dog they saw today. (Image thanks to NOAA, Lieutenant (j.g.) Cindy McFee, NOAA Corps)

     

     

    Written on Saturday, 12 January 2019 21:49 in Expedition Updates
  • Getting Close!

    It warmed up today for our South Pole Last Degree ski team - but only by a few degrees! Even though it was warmer the wind was a constant companion, as it often is. Antarctic is the coldest, windiest, highest and driest continent on Earth.

    The team is narrowing in on the pole. They expect to get there tomorrow if all goes as planned. Today they learned that the kite they saw yesterday was one of two French kiters who skied from Hercules Inlet to the South Pole. The skiers stayed for a couple days before turning around to kite-ski back. The winds, which typically flow from the Pole towards the coasts, will allow them to travel greater distances with the use of a kite, but it's a lot of work!

    If the visibility improves tomorrow they can expect to see the station as far away as 7 or 8 miles (sometimes ever further). At first it feels like a trick on the eyes: a mirage-like blip that is vague, and seems to disappear if you look directly at it. Then, as you get closer, it begins to take shape. Large antennas and radar stations... then buildings... then smaller structures like trucks, then windows on the buildings. Maybe a person or two. It seems very surreal, sort of like the rebel station on the frozen planet of Hoth in the Star Wars series. Their approach to the station will be very deliberate, following a series of waypoints to avoid sensitive areas that are a part of scientific studies. 

    When we talked to the team they were having crackers and salami and preparing for bed. They are looking forward to an exciting day tomorrow. Our fingers are crossed that they reach the Pole!

    We are hoping for an audio update but it has not yet arrived. We'll post it if/when it arrives. 

    Check back again tomorrow for another update from the team!

    Below: If you could view our team from a distance as they ski to the Pole this is what they would look like:

    Below: A typical tent kitchen scene cooking up an all-time favorite: Surf and turf!

    Written on Saturday, 12 January 2019 01:42 in Expedition Updates

 

Are you ready to join us on a polar expedition?

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Download Now PolarExplorers Insurance Form
 
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Email Us
Phone 1.847.256.4409
Toll-Free USA/CAN. 800.732.7328